Latest news from the quinta

July 29th, 2016. Post by Quinta do Vale

This blog tends to feature often lengthy and mostly fairly detailed descriptions of the work here. Shorter updates, anecdotes, comments, photos, links and more get posted to Facebook. Keep up with us directly on Facebook or via the feed below.

Quinta do Vale

Quinta do Vale at Quinta do Vale.

Tryling a new idea in wood treatment to deter insect attack. Linseed oil, before and after mixing with chilli powder.
... See MoreSee Less

4

Tryling a new idea in wood treatment to deter insect attack. Linseed oil, before and after mixing with chilli powder.

Quinta do Vale at Quinta do Vale.

What resulted from the homemade wood stain. Ferrous acetate (made from steeping rusty nails in red wine vinegar) together with the stain made from the green walnuts this week.The solution was diluted 1:3 in water to be applied to cleaned chestnut beams.
... See MoreSee Less

6

What resulted from the homemade wood stain. Ferrous acetate (made from steeping rusty nails in red wine vinegar) together with the stain made from the green walnuts this week.The solution was diluted 1:3 in water to be applied to cleaned chestnut beams.

Stephen Hendry, Verity McCabe and 23 others like this

View previous comments

Karina SzilagyiLovely colour!

6
Avatar

Gail Hart~is it a preservative

6   ·  1

1 Reply

Avatar

Claire DonnellyNice, n I like the floor- ceiling boards

5
Avatar

Anthony Bantonyou are the best home builder ever

5   ·  2

2 Replies

Avatar

Comment on Facebook

Quinta do Vale at Quinta do Vale.

One of the highlights of this year has been finally getting the top two ponds full and holding water. This is part of the overall strategy to slow and hold more water on the land but I've learned it takes time - a few years - to get unlined ponds fully established in the landscape. No doubt these will continue to require ongoing adjustments but to have this much water on the quinta at this time of year is a novelty and a treat.
... See MoreSee Less

1

One of the highlights of this year has been finally getting the top two ponds full and holding water. This is part of the overall strategy to slow and hold more water on the land but Ive learned it takes time - a few years - to get unlined ponds fully established in the landscape. No doubt these will continue to require ongoing adjustments but to have this much water on the quinta at this time of year is a novelty and a treat.

Stephen Hendry, Marta Gillette and 23 others like this

View previous comments

Veronica Balfour Paulamazing. Is it rainwater from the winter?

1

1 Reply

Avatar

Sandrine Ferwerda CoosemansSo if these are unlined ponds... how do they hold their water? I've heard of using pigs, but I don't think you did that?

1

1 Reply

Avatar

Kate HolmesThis is great to see, we are planning our water systems now for the autumn and hoping to make two ponds. One from rainwater and one from a winter fed spring.

7   ·  1
Avatar

Trude SargeantJust so beautiful! We are not so fortunate to have a running spring-fed river/stream. Plans to utilize rainwater for a cascade of duck ponds are still just that, plans. I am all inspired now, after reading your post. Thanks

7   ·  2
Avatar

Joaquim CondeIt's great to see your progress. It's been a couple of year since my stop by. I would like to visit you this November when I make my trip there for Olive harvest.

7   ·  1

1 Reply

Avatar

Comment on Facebook

Quinta do Vale at Quinta do Vale.

Temperatures in the high 30s recently have brought a few green walnuts down. A great opportunity to make some natural dye.
... See MoreSee Less

1

Temperatures in the high 30s recently have brought a few green walnuts down. A great opportunity to make some natural dye.

Stephen Hendry, Nadine Zdanovich and 13 others like this

Feli DeliWendy, If you could share the method, I would be so grateful. Thanks.

1   ·  1
Avatar

Quinta do ValeIt's pretty simple. Collect your green walnuts off the ground, smash them with a suitable implement (I used a stone-on-stone method), break them up a bit, add water and boil for a while until the desired depth of colour is achieved. Allow to cool then strain. You could also steep them in ammonia but I didn't have any ammonia handy. You get a dark brown walnutty sort of colour. I plan to mix this with ferrous acetate mordant (made by steeping rusty nails in vinegar). I'm then going to try it as a wood stain, followed by chilli linseed oil, for some interior wood beams. Nothing ventured ... :-)

1   ·  1

1 Reply

Avatar

Comment on Facebook

Quinta do Vale at Quinta do Vale.

Just a wee lunchtime sampling of the berries picked today - raspberries, tayberries, strawberries, redcurrants, blueberries, jostaberries, gooseberries (green and purple) and yellow cherries. I don't think it's possible to ever have too many berries.
... See MoreSee Less

3

Just a wee lunchtime sampling of the berries picked today - raspberries, tayberries, strawberries, redcurrants, blueberries, jostaberries, gooseberries (green and purple) and yellow cherries. I dont think its possible to ever have too many berries.

Nadine Zdanovich, Stephen Hendry and 23 others like this

吳麗蘭So very beautiful!

3
Avatar

Joaquim CondeAmazing

3
Avatar

Christine GillThey look delicious

3
Avatar

Pam WoolleyColored fruit look FAB I bet they taste even better

2
Avatar

Comment on Facebook

The first vermicomposting toilet system to be installed in the village of Pai das Donas gets its worms. I oversaw the final stages of the project this week along with local architect Vera Ripley. It's an almost exact copy of the one here at Quinta do Vale. There will be more, we're told! A força das minhocas! ... See MoreSee Less

3

The first vermicomposting toilet system to be installed in the village of Pai das Donas gets its worms. I oversaw the final stages of the project this week along with local architect Vera Ripley. Its an almost exact copy of the one here at Quinta do Vale. There will be more, were told! A força das minhocas!

Nadine Zdanovich, Raphael Daden and 23 others like this

View previous comments

Clare MonsonCongratulations! This is huge, really well done xxx

3   ·  1

2 Replies

Avatar

Veronica Balfour PaulThis is great news. So well done. Let's spread the wor....d!

3   ·  1
Avatar

Loetje LoeWoohoooo! Amazing achievement. Congrats to you both and the little ones!

3   ·  1

1 Reply

Avatar

Michelle SheridanExcellent!

3
Avatar

Mara RaraAmazing :D

3
Avatar

Comment on Facebook

Quinta do Vale with Katie Garner and 4 others at Quinta do Vale.

Caravan shelter completion ceremony, proving what a sturdy and bodacious structure it is. Big thanks to Joselin Mlt for excellent joinery skills.
... See MoreSee Less

1

Caravan shelter completion ceremony, proving what a sturdy and bodacious structure it is. Big thanks to Joselin Mlt for excellent joinery skills.

Nadine Zdanovich, Marta Gillette and 23 others like this

Silver SpacecraftIt's good to give them a little shelter. Also good to get the wheels off and stored out of the sun... :-)

1
Avatar

Naomi LaneDREAM TEAM

1   ·  3
Avatar

Comment on Facebook

Quinta do Vale with Naomi Lane and 4 others at Quinta do Vale.

Bridge completion ceremony. Big thanks to Michael Eckerman for such a stunning and original structure. Not half bad for an old dude.
... See MoreSee Less

1

Bridge completion ceremony. Big thanks to Michael Eckerman for such a stunning and original structure. Not half bad for an old dude.

Nadine Zdanovich, Shirley Hockling and 23 others like this

Karina SzilagyiIt looks magical! :)

1
Avatar

Feli DeliAmazing work

1
Avatar

Comment on Facebook

Quinta do Vale with Michael Eckerman at Quinta do Vale.

The formwork came out today. The arch for the bridge stands!
... See MoreSee Less

1

The formwork came out today. The arch for the bridge stands!

Nadine Zdanovich, Lorri Thielemann and 23 others like this

Alvaro LapaJust amazing!

1   ·  1
Avatar

William IngersollRock on Michael

1   ·  1
Avatar

Lorri ThielemannBeautiful work!

3
Avatar

Comment on Facebook

Duck ponds

May 15th, 2016. Post by Quinta do Vale

With the building of a duck house, there had to be a duck pond to go with it. or, as it happened, two duck ponds.

In addition to being ponds for ducks, these ponds also form part of the general water-retention strategy for the quinta. The aim is to slow the passage of water through this steep land and spread it as far as possible from the stream, allowing it to infiltrate and hydrate the soils. This promotes the growth of the vegetation which is so essential in improving the soils here. Vegetation decomposes to provide soil carbon. Without soil carbon, these thin soils haven’t a hope of holding onto moisture (or much of their biota) through the hot dry summer months. Irrigation becomes necessary. But build up soil carbon levels enough and eventually irrigation needs are minimal, even zero. So in order to make irrigation unnecessary, it’s initially necessary (at least if any kind of speed is required).

Back to the duck ponds. Or maybe duck puddles would be more accurate. They’re barely large enough to be worthy of the word pond, though they’re more than adequate to keep a couple of ducks happy.

Inlet for the second duck pond

Read the rest of this entry »

Ponds four years on

May 12th, 2016. Post by Quinta do Vale

It’s been quite a saga, this business of creating unlined ponds. I particularly wanted unlined ponds, because their principal purpose is to provide hydration for their surroundings in the course of slowing the passage of water through the quinta. But as I’ve learned, it takes a while for them to stabilise. There are six of them; two sets of two on the top and bottom terraces above and below the yurt terrace, and another pair of very small duck ponds on the bottom terrace. Small ponds – which these all are due to limitations of terrace width and slope – are much more sensitive to small perturbations.

Spillway between the ponds on the bottom terrace

Spillway between the ponds on the bottom terrace

Read the rest of this entry »

Subterranean heating & cooling system

May 11th, 2016. Post by Quinta do Vale

The previous post on the geodesic dome greenhouse outlined the logic in choosing a dome for this site and how it was by far the better option for fitting in all the things I wanted to have in this greenhouse. These include an aquaponics system and a bathroom as well as growing space for tropical and frost-tender fruits and vegetables, seed growing areas, a rocket-stove water heater and a worm farm – a fair bit to cram into an area measuring just 7x5m at the outset.

Geodesic dome greenhouse frame

I also wanted to build in a subterranean heating & cooling system (SHCS) to make even better use of all the thermal mass present in the solid bedrock floor and back wall. This is a proven low-tech solution for maintaining comfortable temperatures and humidity levels in the greenhouse year round. It can minimise or even eliminate the need for supplementary heating or cooling.

Read the rest of this entry »

Geodesic dome greenhouse

May 8th, 2016. Post by Quinta do Vale

Back in July 2012 we dug a chunk out of the mountainside in preparation for a ferrocement rainwater harvesting tank. Plans for the tank were later shelved due to budget constraints, but a good use for the site was never in doubt. It’s one of the few parts of the quinta to have sun at winter solstice, so was perfect for a greenhouse.

Geodesic dome greenhouse site

Read the rest of this entry »

Extreme weather

April 21st, 2016. Post by Quinta do Vale

People don’t seem very geared up for rain in Portugal, preferring umbrellas to raincoats. It’s not as if the rainfall in Central Portugal isn’t respectable either – the annual average for this area is 1040mm or thereabouts (depending on source). Amazingly, it’s even slightly more than where I used to live in the Scottish Borders. The difference is it falls over an average of 120 days, not 300 or so.

Portuguese wet weather gear

Portuguese wet weather gear

The early part of winter was unusually dry and warm. I had tobacco and freesia in flower in December and nectarines in blossom in January! But with the turn of the year, the rain finally arrived. In early February we had 10% of our annual average rainfall here over the course of one weekend.

Read the rest of this entry »

Poultry rethink and a duck house

March 23rd, 2016. Post by Quinta do Vale

As those who’ve followed us on Facebook for a while will know, our 4 hens were massacred in July 2014 by ‘free range’ local dogs. Although the hens were kept in a secure compound which not even the foxes had managed to get into, these dogs succeeded in opening the fastening on the gate, broke it down and got in. I found the bodies of two of the hens. The other two were taken. They were only 2½ years old and at the peak of their laying. It was a sad loss.

Quinta hens

It was all the more upsetting considering the effort put into building a really secure compound for them. I’d catered for large ‘free range’ dogs in building the compound, but not ones with door-opening skills. This forced a major rethink on how I was to keep and protect poultry going forward. It came back again to the initial conundrum I’d faced.

Read the rest of this entry »

Swaleage

August 3rd, 2015. Post by Quinta do Vale

It’s been a long time since this blog was last updated. Those keeping up with us on Facebook will have some inkling of what’s been going on at the quinta in the meantime, but I’ve failed dismally at getting to the more detailed documentation of it all. Mostly a case of too busy doing the doing to be reporting the doing …

Following the successful implementation of a swale system on the bottom terrace last year, this last Spring I put in a similar system on the terrace above it. It’s a narrow terrace with very similar problems to the one below it – soil so dry in summer it barely supported a few fruit trees (which consequently dropped most of their fruit before it got anywhere near ripe) amongst grasses and wildflowers which would be dry and dead by July. In summer, the soil turned to dust in your hand and blew away.

Mid fruit terrace

The terrace when we first saw the quinta in November 2008 – a few neglected fruit trees and a lot of encroaching bracken

Mid fruit terrace

The same terrace in May last year – a few more fruit trees, a lot less bracken, but still a largely barren terrace

Read the rest of this entry »

A dining area for the wee house

November 12th, 2014. Post by Quinta do Vale

Following on from the completion of the kitchen at the wee house, the next step was to create a dining area. The terrace in front of the house on the lower level was the logical place for this – lovely views through the olive trees down to the village and across the valley, and grapes vines already planted and just asking for a trellis to grow over to create a shaded seating area. Plus it had already been identified as a fine place to sit …

The wee house dining area

Read the rest of this entry »

Swales

November 11th, 2014. Post by Quinta do Vale

Swales – level ditches dug to follow the contours of the land – are one of the principal ingredients of permaculture earthworks which are, by and large, recipes for catching and holding rainwater runoff and encouraging it to slowly infiltrate the soil rather than being lost to the nearest river. Because they’re level, swales don’t channel the water away but hold it in situ until it soaks into the soil. They can be dug to any sort of scale and used alone or, as part of an integrated water catchment system over an entire property, in combination with other elements like ponds, infiltration basins and dams.

Bottom ponds

On narrow terraces and steep mountain slopes with thin soils – ie. here – swales are not something you can use on a large scale, but they can still be useful. When I dug the lower ponds, the effect on the ability of the surrounding soil to support abundant growth was immediate and impressive, but it didn’t extend too far along the terrace. Just 2 metres away the soil was so dry in summer it barely supported a few grasses and wildflowers and would turn to dust in your hand and blow away. So after working out the contours of the terrace, I decided to extend the area of hydration much further along by using the ponds to feed small swales.

Read the rest of this entry »

Yurt makeover

October 5th, 2014. Post by Quinta do Vale

The yurt has been my home for 5 years now. It’s stood up to the extremes of Portuguese weather reasonably well, especially after building a porch to protect the doorway (4 years ago) and covering it with shade netting to stop the canvas disintegrating in the sun (3 years ago). It’s settled nicely into the landscape and as the gardens mature around it, is becoming less and less obtrusive.

The yurt becoming part of the landscape

Read the rest of this entry »