Latest news from the quinta

August 17th, 2017. Post by Quinta do Vale

This blog tends to feature often lengthy and mostly fairly detailed descriptions of the work here. Shorter updates, anecdotes, comments, photos, links and more get posted to Facebook. Keep up with us directly on Facebook or via the feed below.

Quinta do Vale

The quinta's newest family member - Nina the Ninja. ... See MoreSee Less

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The quintas newest family member - Nina the Ninja.

 

Comment on Facebook

Cats are the best... :-)

Into everything at that age, the vole population will eventually attract him/her as an endless facination... If my feline sisters are any guide? 😋

This year the garden has been stunning. I mean this in the sense of Sheer Total Utter Neglect-ning. I've been concentrating on the greenhouse and building work so decided to let the garden take care of itself. I reckoned it would also be interesting to discover how much drought resilience I've managed to build into the soils. This courgette was discovered in the yurt garden which has received almost zero irrigation for the entire summer. As in I think I've maybe watered it twice. ... See MoreSee Less

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This year the garden has been stunning. I mean this in the sense of Sheer Total Utter Neglect-ning. Ive been concentrating on the greenhouse and building work so decided to let the garden take care of itself. I reckoned it would also be interesting to discover how much drought resilience Ive managed to build into the soils. This courgette was discovered in the yurt garden which has received almost zero irrigation for the entire summer. As in I think Ive maybe watered it twice.

 

Comment on Facebook

:-)

Kate Brooks

Great! Save the seeds and use them next year! I've seen a guy growing tomatoes with less and less water over time, and now he manages to get tomatoes with basically no water! 😉

Pizza night! And a reluctant farewell and many thanks to Ali Huntley who's been volunteering here the last month and combining it with researching her dissertation on eco-immigration. ... See MoreSee Less

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Pizza night! And a reluctant farewell and many thanks to Ali Huntley whos been volunteering here the last month and combining it with researching her dissertation on eco-immigration.

We've been working through a lot of small jobs recently to get them out of the way before tackling larger ones. The store room in the main building has had a good sorting out, cleaning and limewashing of walls. ... See MoreSee Less

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Weve been working through a lot of small jobs recently to get them out of the way before tackling larger ones. The store room in the main building has had a good sorting out, cleaning and limewashing of walls.

 

Comment on Facebook

I can't wait to see all done and filled with preserved produce. One day I hope to visit you Wendy :), of course if you don't mined. I can work for my board and food :D

Way up at the top of the pine woodland in this dry and barren forest floor, two chestnut seedlings have sprouted. ... See MoreSee Less

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Way up at the top of the pine woodland in this dry and barren forest floor, two chestnut seedlings have sprouted.

 

Comment on Facebook

That is wonderful news!

nature is wonderful at bouncing back....

Nature, life will find a way.

And they don't do very well in pinetree woodland, they say...

much safer against forest fires

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It's a good year for apples. These are Braeburns growing on the grey water from the bathroom. ... See MoreSee Less

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Its a good year for apples. These are Braeburns growing on the grey water from the bathroom.

 

Comment on Facebook

Where did the trees come from?

Are they resistant to Apple-scab (venturia ineaqualis)?

apple year for sure! We so many, in our land there were already some tree, this year we planted some more of royal gala which is my favourite and one of the most appreciated in portugal, but the ones there were already there are regional varieties, camoesa rosa and bravo esmolfe

Our apples (in Matarranya, Aragon, Spain) are doing great as well! We've had more rain than the last few summers too :-)

Lindas beij

Wow!!!

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See what we have done with our love affair with our own cleverness, our straight line thinking, our forgetting how everything is connected and interdependent, our failure in our role as the gardeners of this planet ... Paul Stamets explains the role of decaying natural woodland in the health of bees."Mycodiversity is our biosecurity. Let's celebrate decomposition. Let's let it rot." Paul Stamets, speaker, author, mycologist, medical researcher and entrep... ... See MoreSee Less

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Video image

 

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The saga of the communal building

August 9th, 2017. Post by Quinta do Vale

It’s been a while since I posted about progress on the main building. More than 3 years, in fact. You’d think in that time it would be finished, but no …

This building – what will eventually be the communal ‘hub’ of the quinta – has presented me and those who’ve worked on it with a lot of challenges. Many more by far than anything else on the quinta. As a task master, it’s been strict and demanding. As a critique of workmanship, it’s been uncompromising. With a relentless insistence, it’s defied attempts to make do with ‘good enough’. Any work that’s fallen short – either by me or builders working on it – has been slapped back in our faces and has had to be done again. I don’t even want to think about the cost, but it’s been far more than budgeted, both in money and time, and it’s still a good way from being finished.

By turns it’s puzzled and confused me; dismayed and depressed me. For a long time I simply couldn’t understand why everything to do with it should have to be so difficult, especially when everything else was going so well. What was I missing? For nearly two years (while waiting for work to be completed and then redone … yet again …) it seemed like too much to give headspace to and I simply turned my back on it and got on with other projects.

The communal building when we first saw the quinta

The communal building as it was when we first saw the quinta

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Greenhouse grow dome

July 23rd, 2017. Post by Quinta do Vale

Why would anyone need a greenhouse in Portugal? Given adequate water and soil fertility, the climate provides more or less ideal growing conditions pretty much year round. General climatic conditions though are one thing. Specific microclimates are another. This quinta has mountain ridges to the south and west and doesn’t get much heat from the sun early in the year. As a result, the clay soils are slow to warm in Spring. Any summer vegetable planted out much before May tends to stand still and then take a while to get going again once soil temperatures rise, so peppers and aubergines frequently don’t get harvested until October and November. A greenhouse in the sunniest spot on the quinta would make a huge difference. I could grow plants from seed in early Spring, bring them on while the soils warm up, and overwinter those which can be effectively perennialised for an early start the following Spring.

I also wanted to experiment with aquaponics to find a way of growing vegetables intensively without the need for supplemental irrigation.

The completion of the geodesic dome greenhouse was consequently eagerly anticipated. The covers went on at the end of April. Seeds were sown and plantings made. And since then, I’ve been revising my ideas of how growing our food here can be achieved almost as fast as the plants themselves have been growing.

Geodesic dome greenhouse covers installed, end of April 2017

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Geodome greenhouse progress

May 22nd, 2017. Post by Quinta do Vale

Projects here seem to have their own timing. What seem like frustrating delays at the time have an uncanny knack of turning out to be necessary pauses: intervals which allow for much better solutions to emerge. The geodome greenhouse has been no exception. With the groundwork complete by the middle of last summer, I was hoping to have it covered in time for winter. This wasn’t to be. My fault mostly. I wasn’t happy with the lack of solid UV resistance data and guarantees on clear PVC and went off to ferret out something more robust. Several lengthy explorations into such materials as ETFE and polycarbonate later, it was clear that robust was beyond budget-busting, so in the end I came full circle back to the PVC.

But during the delay, two things happened. One of the suppliers we were in contact with listed a new high transparency UV-treated PVC film. And Liam acquired a high-frequency PVC welder. I’m sure neither of these facts will mean much to many, but take it from me: the end result is just so much better than it would have been had neither of those two things happened.

The greenhouse cover is now almost complete!

The PVC cover goes onto the geodome greenhouse

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Duck ponds

May 15th, 2016. Post by Quinta do Vale

With the building of a duck house, there had to be a duck pond to go with it. or, as it happened, two duck ponds.

In addition to being ponds for ducks, these ponds also form part of the general water-retention strategy for the quinta. The aim is to slow the passage of water through this steep land and spread it as far as possible from the stream, allowing it to infiltrate and hydrate the soils. This promotes the growth of the vegetation which is so essential in improving the soils here. Vegetation decomposes to provide soil carbon. Without soil carbon, these thin soils haven’t a hope of holding onto moisture (or much of their biota) through the hot dry summer months. Irrigation becomes necessary. But build up soil carbon levels enough and eventually irrigation needs are minimal, even zero. So in order to make irrigation unnecessary, it’s initially necessary (at least if any kind of speed is required).

Back to the duck ponds. Or maybe duck puddles would be more accurate. They’re barely large enough to be worthy of the word pond, though they’re more than adequate to keep a couple of ducks happy.

Inlet for the second duck pond

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Ponds four years on

May 12th, 2016. Post by Quinta do Vale

It’s been quite a saga, this business of creating unlined ponds. I particularly wanted unlined ponds, because their principal purpose is to provide hydration for their surroundings in the course of slowing the passage of water through the quinta. But as I’ve learned, it takes a while for them to stabilise. There are six of them; two sets of two on the top and bottom terraces above and below the yurt terrace, and another pair of very small duck ponds on the bottom terrace. Small ponds – which these all are due to limitations of terrace width and slope – are much more sensitive to small perturbations.

Spillway between the ponds on the bottom terrace

Spillway between the ponds on the bottom terrace

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Subterranean heating & cooling system

May 11th, 2016. Post by Quinta do Vale

The previous post on the geodesic dome greenhouse outlined the logic in choosing a dome for this site and how it was by far the better option for fitting in all the things I wanted to have in this greenhouse. These include an aquaponics system and a bathroom as well as growing space for tropical and frost-tender fruits and vegetables, seed growing areas, a rocket-stove water heater and a worm farm – a fair bit to cram into an area measuring just 7x5m at the outset.

Geodesic dome greenhouse frame

I also wanted to build in a subterranean heating & cooling system (SHCS) to make even better use of all the thermal mass present in the solid bedrock floor and back wall. This is a proven low-tech solution for maintaining comfortable temperatures and humidity levels in the greenhouse year round. It can minimise or even eliminate the need for supplementary heating or cooling.

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Geodesic dome greenhouse

May 8th, 2016. Post by Quinta do Vale

Back in July 2012 we dug a chunk out of the mountainside in preparation for a ferrocement rainwater harvesting tank. Plans for the tank were later shelved due to budget constraints, but a good use for the site was never in doubt. It’s one of the few parts of the quinta to have sun at winter solstice, so was perfect for a greenhouse.

Geodesic dome greenhouse site

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Extreme weather

April 21st, 2016. Post by Quinta do Vale

People don’t seem very geared up for rain in Portugal, preferring umbrellas to raincoats. It’s not as if the rainfall in Central Portugal isn’t respectable either – the annual average for this area is 1040mm or thereabouts (depending on source). Amazingly, it’s even slightly more than where I used to live in the Scottish Borders. The difference is it falls over an average of 120 days, not 300 or so.

Portuguese wet weather gear

Portuguese wet weather gear

The early part of winter was unusually dry and warm. I had tobacco and freesia in flower in December and nectarines in blossom in January! But with the turn of the year, the rain finally arrived. In early February we had 10% of our annual average rainfall here over the course of one weekend.

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Poultry rethink and a duck house

March 23rd, 2016. Post by Quinta do Vale

As those who’ve followed us on Facebook for a while will know, our 4 hens were massacred in July 2014 by ‘free range’ local dogs. Although the hens were kept in a secure compound which not even the foxes had managed to get into, these dogs succeeded in opening the fastening on the gate, broke it down and got in. I found the bodies of two of the hens. The other two were taken. They were only 2½ years old and at the peak of their laying. It was a sad loss.

Quinta hens

It was all the more upsetting considering the effort put into building a really secure compound for them. I’d catered for large ‘free range’ dogs in building the compound, but not ones with door-opening skills. This forced a major rethink on how I was to keep and protect poultry going forward. It came back again to the initial conundrum I’d faced.

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Swaleage

August 3rd, 2015. Post by Quinta do Vale

It’s been a long time since this blog was last updated. Those keeping up with us on Facebook will have some inkling of what’s been going on at the quinta in the meantime, but I’ve failed dismally at getting to the more detailed documentation of it all. Mostly a case of too busy doing the doing to be reporting the doing …

Following the successful implementation of a swale system on the bottom terrace last year, this last Spring I put in a similar system on the terrace above it. It’s a narrow terrace with very similar problems to the one below it – soil so dry in summer it barely supported a few fruit trees (which consequently dropped most of their fruit before it got anywhere near ripe) amongst grasses and wildflowers which would be dry and dead by July. In summer, the soil turned to dust in your hand and blew away.

Mid fruit terrace

The terrace when we first saw the quinta in November 2008 – a few neglected fruit trees and a lot of encroaching bracken

Mid fruit terrace

The same terrace in May last year – a few more fruit trees, a lot less bracken, but still a largely barren terrace

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